My Crochet JW Anderson Cardigan

I can’t say why I decided to jump on the Harry Styles cardigan bandwagon, I feel way too old for this sort of game. Am I woollen spun mutton dressed as soft worsted lamb? I can’t help it, sometimes I am filled with creative urges and can’t rest until I have rummaged through the yarn stash to find what will satisfy them.

Let me first state a disclaimer: I have not intended to create a step-by-step pattern/tutorial. Think of it more as a chat with detail. If you have crochet experience and you want make yourself a chunky-ish crochet cardigan then there is enough information written here, and discussed in the YouTube video (click on the pic above to go to the episode), to ensure that you can make it happily. You’ll be tangled in yarn, but hopefully, you’ll also be happy. I assume you know crochet and are not brand new to my absolute favourite of crafts.

Right, I’m not going to fuss. Let’s just get straight on it. Please read on for all the good stuff.

The ultimate comfort combo of slippers n cardi.

You Will Need:

Loads of aran weight yarn in the colours of your choice. Whether working as individual squares or all in one piece, you’ll want 12 grams per square (I weighed a couple of swatch squares and they weighed 11 point something).

I used a 6mm hook. Normally I’d use a 5 or 5.5mm hook for aran weight as I have a loose tension but I wanted this cardi to have a drapier finish.

5 buttons. (Mine are 3cm diameter).

Needle for seaming together and weaving in a bajillion ends.

Fun Cardi Facts:

My finished cardigan measures: Length: 55cm / 21.5 inches. Width of body: 63cm / 25 inches. Sleeve length: 58cm / 23 inches. Sleeve circumference: 36cm / 14 inches. I am a UK size 10 and this would still have lots of positive ease if you’re a UK 14. After that I reckon the fit would change and you should consider adjusting your square sizes. Any smaller than a size 10 and you might find it’s too big so make each square smaller.

Each square is 18 stitches by 13 rows. To size up or down, it’s about 1 row and 2 stitches per cm (just under half an inch) so add or subtract that amount to change the sizes.

My squares are 5×5 inches.

The stitches I used were mostly UK half trebles (US hdc). Where I write “HT” on the chart below, that stands for Hounds Tooth stitch (must make a tutorial for this myself but there are loads on YouTube already), “FLO” stands for front loop only. I am linking to a scarf tutorial of mine HERE. It uses the same technique.

For the animal print squares I went to Lottie & Albert for inspiration. Lindsay has a free chart that creates a much larger piece of crochet with tr sts rather than htr.

I began my pieces with a foundationless half treble (US hdc). This was a good base to then begin the colour work of the squares. Using the same colour as the ribbing helps to ensure it looks like a cohesive join too. Multiply the number of stitches per square by the amount of squares. Working on one giant piece like I did? Then it’s a foundation of 162. The sleeves were 54.

The ribbing is made in a similar way to the FLO stitch I use. Again, use the scarf tute HERE. I chained 13 for the waist band and 10 for the cuffs. Cuffs are 26 rows, no idea what the waist band is and there’s no way I’m counting them all (soz!) but it’s about 4 inches shorter than the main body piece. This brings it in to make it a better shape. It’s a technique I’ve robbed from my mate Heather of HG Designs Crochet.

The button band is a starter of 9ch and is worked onto the cardigan directly using an interesting technique that should be part of every crocheter’s repertoire. Rather than me type out an explanation, I suggest you watch the vid, it’s all there.

Step By Step Basics:

  1. Make pieces.
  2. Attach ribbing to main body.
  3. Seam sleeves & then add cuffs.
  4. Join at shoulders.
  5. Make button band/collar (see the vid, I show how).
  6. Attach sleeves. Use plenty of stitch markers to help with easing them in. Double check you’re not going to sew them on inside out like I did the first time!
  7. Sew on buttons.

Charts:

Neck Shaping:

You don’t have to shape at the neck like I did. But if you find it terribly flattering and can’t live without it, once you hit the last/top squares at the neck (the triangley ones indicated above), it’s a simple matter of one decrease per row. I say “simple”, I actually made it much harder for myself by having both squares be patterny. If you don’t fancy a decrease on the animal print colour work, or the hounds tooth square. Change them to a plain htr. It might save your last semblance of sanity.

Animal print rather than a houndstooth print.

Last Few Bits:

OK, I think that’s it. Please do let me know if you have any questions. I’ll try and help if I can but as I said before, this is aimed at those with at least the basics of crochet under their belt.

You wouldn’t believe the amount of work that goes into even doing this kind of casual outline of a pattern. Come and join me on Patreon and/or buy me Ko-fi !! Thank you!!

When you’ve made yourself an awesome cardi, please do let me know. The easiest thing to do is find me on Instagram as @zeendandroger

Right, I’m off to work on my next outstanding piece of crochet. See you soon. xxx

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Did you really read it all?!